Things You Should Never Do With Your Japanese Knives

To get the most out of your Japanese kitchen knives Australia, you need to use them and store them properly. Japanese knives are known to perform their work effectively and efficiently. They give clean cuts and you don’t apply a lot of force when using them. However, if you do not use them or store them properly, you will end up damaging them. Here are a few things you should never do with your Japanese knives.

Storing in wet places or leaving it in the drying rack

If you have a dedicated space to place your Japanese knife after rinsing, to ensure it dries without danger of knocking it into other utensils, and if you have a set of perfectly well-maintained stainless-steel knives that run no rusting risk, then you can rinse your kitchen knives and allow them to air dry. However, the reality is that your knife is going to bang against hard things and the small pits and scratches on the surface of the knife are going to turn into large scratches and pits. Rust will start eating its way into them. You should therefore wash your knife by hand. Use a towel to dry it after washing.

Scraping your knife across your cutting board

This is a very easy habit to fall into. You have just finished chopping a tomato or onion and it is scattered over the chopping board. You scrape it together with your Japanese kitchen knives to put it into a neat pile. The problem is that the edge of your knife is strong when pressed down. However, it can easily bend when you push it from side to side. This means that when you scrape up the food with your kitchen knife perpendicular to the chopping board, the edge will be thrown out of alignment and become dull.

If you have to use your knife to pick food on your board, hold your knife at a sharp angle. Maintain an angle that is parallel to the chopping board and gently slide it. Alternatively, you can use the dull side of the blade. Professionals use a bench scraper. This is a tool specifically designed for this task.

Using it dull

You will require to use more pressure to cut using a dull knife. The more pressure you use, the higher chances of slipping and cutting yourself. When you apply more pressure, it also means that accidents are likely to be worse than a small cut you are likely to get from a sharp knife that is used gently. You need to ensure that your knife is sharp enough before using it.

Leaving your knife too close to the counter edge

When you have a habit of leaving your Japanese kitchen knives Australia close to the counter with the handle hanging in the air, someone can easily brush against the knife and topple it down. This might cut your toe and damage the blade of your knife. It can even cause the knife to break,

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