Potato protein – the winner of the female market

A recent study by researchers at McMaster University found that the recommended daily protein intake may not be enough to maintain young women’s muscle, while eating protein from ordinary potatoes can help maintain muscle. Funded by the research and Education Alliance, the research results of food and nutrition in Europe have been published in the Journal of nutrition.

Although the protein found in potatoes is low, growing large quantities of potatoes and then isolating the protein can provide some measurable benefits. This study focuses on the potential benefits of this plant in replacing animal derived proteins.

The researchers recruited young women in their early 20s whose diets contained protein, according to the recommended daily dietary intake (RDA), which was 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day.

A group of participants also ate isolated potato protein in the form of pudding, so their RDA intake doubled to 1.6g/kg/d. The other group took a placebo.

Food and nutrition in Europe researchers found that women who took extra potato protein produced new protein faster than women who took placebo. The study shows that the recommended daily intake is not enough to maintain the muscles of these young women. More interestingly, it is generally believed that the quality of protein extracted from plants is not as good as that extracted from animals, but it can produce such beneficial effects.

In order to measure the effect of exercise on muscles, the two groups of women only needed to exercise one leg. It’s a bit unconventional, but you don’t need extra exercise to see the effect on the same person. Scientists have not found any additional benefits of potato protein in women’s athletic legs. In other words, exercise is a more effective stimulus than protein to produce new muscle proteins.

In order to meet the growing needs of the global population, the demand for protein has risen sharply, and plant protein can fill this gap. This study provides a basis for the nutritional support of plant protein to muscle.

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