Everything You Need To Know About Future Smart Cities And Water

One of the most important prices of important infrastructure is the smart water concept. With the high population in cities around the world, the consumption of water will inevitably grow. Smart city water is wastewater and water infrastructure that ensures water and the energy used to transport it are managed effectively. Smart city water systems are designed to gather actionable and meaningful data about the pressure, flow and distribution of water in a city.

It is also critical that the forecasting and consumption of water use are accurate. The distribution and management of water systems in a city should be viable and sound in the long term to maintain the growth of the city in any country and should also be equipped with the capacity to be networked and monitored with other important systems to obtain more granular and sophisticated information on how they are doing and affecting each other.

More efficiencies are gained when departments in a city can share actionable and relevant information. One important example is that the management team of the watershed can share stormwater modelling information that indicates probable flooding zones and times based on predictive precipitation intelligence. The transportation department in a city in any country needsto reroute traffic pre-emptively and accordingly to alert the population using mass notification.

While water systems are often overlooked by most authorities, they are very critical components of the management of energy in smart cities. They comprise about 50% of the total energy spent in a smart city. Energy is the biggest controllable cost in smart water operations, yet optimizing water treatment plants and distribution networks has often been ignored or overlooked as a source of freeing up some operating funds by cash-strapped municipalities.

Once facilities are designed and optimized to gather actionable and meaningful data, municipal leaders can make faster and better decisions about their operations. This can result in up to thirty percent energy savings. It can also result in up to a 15% reduction of clean water losses.

The management of water loss is becoming very important around the world and water supplies are stressed by water scarcity and population growth. A lot of regions are experiencing depleting aquifers and others experiencing record droughts. Incorporating smart technologies allows clean water providers to reduce non-revenue water by finding leaks in pipes and predicatively using accurate SCADA data and comparing it to model network stimulations.

When non-revenue water is reduced, it allows municipalities to recover any costs incurred in water treatment and pumping of water – this can be significant. On the wastewater side, organizations have come forth to transform the treatment plants into resource recovery facilities. There are serval examples of plants that can now produce more energy than they require for their operation and then sell the excess energy to the grid. While this isn’t practical for all wastewater treatment plants, it is a worthy innovation and can be facilitated by governments in their bid to improve the smart water concept and benefit business and individuals.

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